Trailer Magazine – Competitive cartage

Competitive CartageBulk haulage specialist Cartage Australia is a company that is not scared of making dramatic changes to its equipment to gain a competitive edge, as seen with its uptake of Performance-Based Standards on a fleet fitted with V.Orlandi couplings.

At the Australian Road Transport Suppliers’ Association’s (ARTSA) Global Heavy Vehicle Leaders Summit in Melbourne this May, key speaker Brendan Richards from consultancy, Ferrier Hodgson, revealed what he believes to be the three main personality traits that contribute to business failure. Listing ego, greed and complacency as the most troublesome characteristics, Brendan said that while some transport companies in Australia struggle with these flaws, true industry leaders are getting it right.

One such thought leader is Cartage Australia’s General Manager, Ray Cauchi, who has been in the business of hauling quarry products since 1977. Far from becoming complacent with his fleet, Ray has never been one to ignore the potential of new technologies or opportunities to get more out of his equipment.

To help the business flourish in an increasingly contested market, Ray investigated if the Performance-Based Standards (PBS) scheme could give Cartage Australia a competitive advantage. Investing in its first PBS-approved truck and dog set – the first in Victoria – in 2007, the company has since become something of a leader in the high productivity scheme, with its entire fleet of truck and dogs approved to carry more payload on select routes. Arguably one of the largest fleets with that level of uptake, Cartage Australia boasts 65 PBS-approved truck and dog combinations all fitted with V.Orlandi E550 50mm tow couplings.

Both the couplings and the PBS scheme lend to Cartage Australia avoiding becoming complacent, with the heavy-duty Italian equipment replacing the components throughout the fleet as soon as it was launched in Australia. “We’d been using another brand of tow couplings and made the switch to V.Orlandi equipment when they came into the country about 20 years ago,” Ray reveals. “Rather than sticking to what we already had, we made the change and have benefitted from it ever since.”

According to Ray, upgrading to V.Orlandi couplings provided his fleet with longer lasting equipment that has also proven capable of the higher mass tasks of his PBS vehicles over the last nine years. “The V.Orlandi couplings are a lot more robust than what we had used previously, so we have found that they last a lot longer than the competition,” Ray says. “They’re also much quicker and easier to maintain and repair, it takes maybe half the time to replace wearing components such as pins and bushes.”

“The V.Orlandi couplings are a lot more robust than what we had used previously, so we have found that they last a lot longer than the competition.” Ray Cauchi

Cartage Australia does all of its tow coupling maintenance in house, giving Ray and his team of mechanics a thorough understanding of the couplings’ design. Far from the complacent characteristics Brendan warns against, Ray says that even with a product that has proven itself in Australia for two decades, V.Orlandi CEO, Gianpietro Mascialino, is always amenable to suggestions for improvements.

“I’ve met Gianpietro many times at trade shows and industry events, and he always listens to our feedback,” Ray says. “The best part is that he’s always happy to not just listen to our suggestions, but go back and make the improvements. Next time I see him, he tells me it has been done. It’s important to have the confirmation that we are valuable to V.Orlandi not just as a customer, but for our input.”

Working alongside Gianpietro is V.Orlandi General Manager, Simon Tortorici, who says that taking customer feedback on board is part of the company’s dedication to improving its products for the Australian market. “The E550 Pacific, for example, has been updated to boast a d-value rating of 330kN, while remaining the lightest coupling in the country at 42kg,” Simon explains.

With V.Orlandi continuing to make improvements to its Australia-specific catalogue of trailer components, Ray says he is confident in the equipment to keep his fleet on the road earning their keep. “The tow coupling is a vital part of the combination, it tows the trailers, and that’s where the payload is,” Ray says. “It’s not something you can afford to get wrong. We’re the type of company to make a change to the fleet if it will give a competitive edge, but we’re not going to change when V.Orlandi is giving us the perfect product. Not in this world.”

Prime Mover Magazine – One of a Kind

news-1-coverAs one of the first transport businesses in the world, Melbourne company Cartage Australia has fully relinquished the classic concept of prescriptive vehicle design and created a fleet that is 100 per cent Performance-Based Standards (PBS) approved. Every piece of equipment bearing the distinctive blue and red livery is now tailored to maximise payload and push the technology envelope – nothing is standard.

Yet, if you ask founders Ray Cauchi and Wayne Vella how they feel about crafting what could be the most progressive quarry transport service in the world, the response is exceedingly modest. “It’s fascinating when you think about how far we have come by embracing PBS, but we’re not doing it for the fame,” says Ray, whose meticulous work ethic has seen him travel across the globe in search of the most efficient transport equipment for the quarry industry. “We haven’t gone down that path because we wanted to write history, but because there was a problem that needed solving. We’re in the quarry business, where the competition is fierce and the work is tough, so standing still can be economically fatal.”

Ever so hands-on, Ray says being in the transport trade is all about creating new opportunities to grow and improve and not let complacency take the lead. “Every new contract is a new challenge to revisit what you consider best practice and look at how you can push the envelope – be it regarding safety, fuel efficiency or payload,” he says. “I think that kind of continuous improvement really is the key to having on-going success in our line of work.”

According to Ray, being exposed to a payload-driven industry like bulk haulage has helped himself and Wayne keep the focus firmly on productivity and embrace PBS early on. “The extreme focus on payload in our line of work has certainly inspired us to make some bold decisions in the past,” he says. “More importantly, though, we work in a high-risk environment, so safety is always at the top of our agenda. What we’ve learned quickly was that with PBS, you can increase your payload quite substantially without compromising on safety, so we provided the ideal breeding ground for PBS equipment, if you will.” Wayne recalls that Cartage Australia was the first company in Victoria to run a PBS-approved truck and five-axle dog combination in 2008, then achieving a payload of 45 tonnes at a GCM of 63 tonnes when using a pre-approved road network. It then became the first fleet in the State to employ a truck and six-axle dog combination, with a payload of 49 tonnes achieved at a GCM of 68.5 tonnes – a set-up that is still popular with the company today.

“Cartage Australia is a young company that was only founded in 2003, but we’ve embraced PBS as soon as it was available in Melbourne, so you can say we’ve grown and matured with the scheme,” he explains. “However, we’ve never made any conscious decision to become a PBS-only fleet, especially not in such a short timeframe. It just happened organically. “That being said, I do think we have a different mind-set compared to those who jumped on the bandwagon of late. Some people are scared by what they don’t understand and simply didn’t buy into the hype at first. But for us, there was nothing holding us back, which gave us a real competitive advantage at the time and is still benefitting us today.”

“Cartage Australia is a young company that was only founded in 2003, but we’ve embraced PBS as soon as it was available in Melbourne, so you can say we’ve grown and matured with the scheme.” Wayne Vella

The result is a company with a surprisingly relaxed attitude toward the inherently complex PBS scheme. “Yes, PBS can be a time-consuming process, but you have to look beyond that and see the Return on Investment,” Wayne says. “What we do is grant our clientele access to game-changing equipment that significantly improves the performance of their own businesses and gives them a competitive edge. Executing such a strategy requires us to be at the leading edge of science – and that means investing in the smartest technology out there.”

Built on that premise, Cartage Australia now has a fleet of 60 trucks that is solely dedicated to pulling PBS-approved trailing equipment – making it the largest bulk haulage company in the
Melbourne region and the only sizable PBS-only fleet in Australia. “It’s a classic ‘one thing led to another’ scenario,” says Wayne. “First you try something new just to explore how it could benefit you, and before you know it you are breaking records you didn’t even know existed.”

According to Ray, with an average age of just 2.5 years, Cartage Australia’s all-Volvo fleet might actually be the youngest in the nation, coming in more than a decade below the average of 13.84 years the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) calculated in March. “I’m not surprised about the difference, because we do a lot differently compared to the average transport business,” he says. “We turn equipment around quickly and never say no to a new safety feature. “We always want the best truck on the road that money can buy, so our brief is simple – spec any extra safety feature you can. We don’t calculate our Return on Investment on safety, that’s just a given for us.”

Ray adds that the entire Cartage fleet is now equipped with Volvo’s iShift transmission, which he considers to be both a safety and productivity feature, as it allows the driver to concentrate on the road and leave both hands on the wheel, while actively contributing to saving fuel. Also important to him are ample power and torque to ensure the Cartage fleet is able to handle even the steepest quarry ascent. The 540hp version of the Volvo FM is performing especially well in that regard, he adds, with close to 20 units of the new model already on the road in Cartage Australia livery.

“We push every truck to the limit here. Working in a metropolitan construction material business is as tough a work environment as it could get, with long periods of stop-and-go traffic and heavy brake use, all while carrying enormous weight on the back. Volvo has done really well in what we believe is the hardest workplace a truck could find.”

When not working on the road, Ray says Cartage Australia’s fleet is covered by a comprehensive Volvo service contract to keep overheads low and ensure a consistently high maintenance standard across the business. It is carried out by CMV Laverton, whose team of mechanics plays a crucial part in Cartage’s story of success, Ray says. “We believe our strength is in providing smart logistics solutions to the construction industry, so that’s what we’d like to focus on. Volvo’s strength is building and maintaining heavy equipment, so we leave that part of the equation to them and keep our business nice and lean.”

In line with that, Ray and Wayne agree that Volvo and Cartage Australia have developed a unique dynamic over time, with the transport business consistently challenging the OEM to push the innovation envelope and Volvo bringing in new technology from around the world for Cartage to trial. “We understand the whole idea of continuous improvement more as a constant dialogue between two businesses aiming for the same outcome. It’s not a race or a competition, it’s more about having the same vision and finding a steady rhythm of questioning everything you do,” says Wayne.

“It’s a new world out there, with 24-7 service expected as standard, and no room for error, so you need to ask the right questions before someone else does it for you. In working with Volvo, we have perfected that thought exchange to a point where the Volvo President personally invited Ray to Sweden to brief top executives on the concept of continuous improvement as we live and breathe it.”

According to Ray, getting to that stage was far less glamorous a process than it may sound, though. “Getting to where we are now was really hard work, but it’s safe to say it all started with PBS. Going down that path didn’t just show us how to transport more freight safely, but also helped us reassess our supplier network in general. Volvo obviously left a lasting impression, but so did component suppliers like SAF-Holland, for example, who we trust in every trailer suspension and coupling-related question. With SAF-Holland, we know we will be looked after in any scenario, which allows us to focus more on our core business.”

Ray and Wayne agree that by embracing modern, high productivity equipment early on, they adopted a high technology mind-set that is very European in nature, with a focus on young, efficient and safe equipment. After the company’s recent move into the port services and bulk storage industry, they say the next challenge will be to transition that attitude into the new business division and keep building it with the same commitment.

“We’re extremely excited about diversifying and expect the port operation to give the company a real boost over the next decade. There’s no reason why we can’t double in size over that time frame, if we only retain the attitude we developed when adopting PBS,” says Ray.

“We want to be the best at what we do, work with the best people and use the best equipment. And if there is a process like PBS that can help us get there, we will embrace it wholeheartedly. It’s as easy as that.”

Read More: Cartage – One of a Kind

Trailer Magazine – One of a Kind

news-2-cover

We work in a high-risk environment, so safety is always at the top of our agenda. We learned quickly that with PBS, you can increase your payload substantially without compromising on safety.

Melbourne company Cartage Australia is one of the first in the world that has relinquished the concept of prescriptive vehicle design and created a fleet that is 100 per cent Performance-Based Standards (PBS) approved. Yet, if you ask founders Ray Cauchi and Wayne Vella how they feel about crafting what could be the most progressive quarry transport service in the world, the response is exceedingly modest.

“It’s fascinating to think about how far we’ve come by embracing PBS, but we’re not doing it for the fame,” says Ray. “We haven’t gone down that path because we wanted to write history, but because there was a problem that needed solving. We’re in the quarry business, where the competition is fierce and the work is tough, so standing still can be economically fatal.”
According to Ray, working in the payload-driven bulk haulage industry helped keep the focus firmly on productivity and embrace PBS early on. “The extreme focus on payload in our line of work as certainly inspired us to make some bold decisions in the past,” he says. “More importantly, we work in a high-risk environment, so safety is always at the top of our agenda. We learned quickly that with PBS, you can increase your payload substantially without compromising on safety.”

In fact, Cartage Australia was the first company in Victoria to purchase a PBS-approved truck and four-axle dog combination in 2007, then running at a GCM of 50.5 tonnes on approved routes across the state. Now the company is running six-axle truck and dog combinations that can carry up to 49 tonnes on the back alone. “Cartage Australia embraced PBS as soon as it was available in Melbourne, but we never made any conscious decision to become a PBSonly fleet. It just happened organically.” The result is a company with a surprisingly relaxed attitude toward the complex  scheme.

“Yes, PBS can be a timeconsuming process, but you have to look beyond that and see the Return on Investment,” Wayne says. “We grant our clientele access to game-changing equipment that significantly improves the performance of their own businesses and gives them a competitive edge. Executing such a strategy requires us to be at the leading edge of science – and that means investing in the smartest technology out there.”

Ray and Wayne agree that by embracing modern, high productivity equipment early on, they adopted a technology mind-set that is very European in nature, with a focus on young, efficient and safe equipment. “We want to be the best at what we do, and if there is a process like PBS that can help us get there, we will embrace it wholeheartedly. It’s as easy as that.

Read More: Trailer Magazine – One of a Kind

Trailer Magazine – Shared Vision

news-3-coverDetermined to raise the productivity levels and safety standards of its fleet, Cartage Australia is now using six-axle side-tippers fitted with SAF-Holland running gear.

Melbourne-based Cartage Australia has established itself as one of the most recognisable names in Australia’s bulk haulage sector by maintaining a tireless work ethic from top-level management through to those behind the wheel.

Operating around Victoria 24 hours a day, seven days a week, Cartage’s resolute attitude stems from its two passionate and highly adaptable founders, Ray Cauchi and Wayne Vella. While some business owners still argue
against changing successful business models, Ray and Wayne say not embracing the concept of continuous improvement would be doing a disservice to its staff, customers and the industry at large.

“Regardless of how busy we get, Wayne and I always get together once a week to talk business, address certain issues and discuss what we can do to improve, whether it’s our equipment or how we manage our drivers’ health,” Ray explains. “I’ve been in the industry for almost four decades and if there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that you can never get complacent. Wayne and I must continually push the boundaries and we’re determined
to look at all opportunities involving quarry products, port services and bulk storage.”

Almost a year ago over lunch, the two discussed the state of the Cartage Australia fleet, with productivity and safety high on the agenda. “Wayne suggested the idea of using side-tippers instead of the end tippers that we were accustomed to,” Ray says. “The idea had come up once or twice before, but we never really talked about it in great detail.” The discussion then took a critical turn. “It wasn’t just about bringing in a standard side-tipper; Wayne wanted the design to have two side-tipping bodies built on the one chassis and have it approved under the Performance-Based Standards (PBS) scheme,” Ray says.

But there was even more to come: “Wayne wanted the side-tipper to run in a six-axle layout and have it towed as part of a rigid and dog combination,” Rays says. “That would address two areas of concern: One, having it as a PBS-approved truck and six-axle dog would allow us to increase our payload and two, a six-axle side-tipper would give us increased stability and be much safer than an end tipper, which is always at risk of a tip over. It would also allow access to almost any warehouse for our growing bulk storage business.”

“It’s a smarter vehicle, which helps us to reduce the number of vehicles on the road while increasing both productivity and safety.” Ray Cauchi

The idea of using PBS-approved equipment isn’t new to Cartage Australia – in fact, all of the company’s rigid and dogs are PBS-approved – but never before has the company had a PBS six-axle dog. “PBS has been absolutely crucial to our operation as it has given us productivity gains between 10-25 per cent on each combination,” Ray says. The challenge then became finding a trailer builder and equipment supplier to bring Wayne’s vision to life. “I spoke to a few manufacturers about our design and Muscat Trailers in Sydney was the first to put its hand up. Once we completed all the paperwork, including liaising with VicRoads and the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator to have it PBS certified, we placed an order for two rigid and six-axle dog combinations at once.”

According to Ray, the custom-made six-axle dog side-tippers – towed by two new Volvo FM rigid end tippers operating with Euro V engines that significantly reduce emissions – the combinations are capable of carrying a 47-tonne payload, which Ray says is two to three tonnes more than a B-double with the same gross weight would be able to haul. “It’s a smarter vehicle, which helps us to reduce the number of vehicles on the road while increasing both productivity and safety.”

Having arrived in September, the new six axle dogs have been spec’d to cart quarry products, and while Cartage Australia has used several suppliers in the past, the one major component brand that the company sticks with is SAF-HOLLAND – from its axle and suspensions, couplings and tow eyes through to ball races and EBS braking systems.

Like Cartage’s previous rigid and dog combinations, the six-axle units feature SAF-HOLLAND’s Intradisc plus Integral axle and suspension system. “There’s never been issues with SAF-HOLLAND,” says Ray. “Its components are very light, the service and support is outstanding and, most importantly, when our drivers need to apply the brakes, the whole combination will quickly stop – just like a car.”

Despite the immediate benefits of the two rigid and six-axle dog combinations, Ray and Wayne will continue open talks on a week-by- week basis as a means to improve and further grow the business. And, Ray says it’s a safe bet SAF-HOLLAND and Muscat Trailers will factor into those discussions as well.

Read More: Shared Vision

Trailer Magazine – Shared Vision

Determined to raise the productivity levels and safety standards of its fleet, Cartage Australia is now using six-axle side-tippers fitted with SAF-HOLLAND running gear.

Melbourne-based Cartage Australia has established itself as one of the most recognisable names in Australia’s bulk haulage sector by maintaining a tireless work ethic from top-level management through to those behind the wheel.

Operating around Victoria 24 hours a day, seven days a week, Cartage’s resolute attitude stems from its two passionate and highly adaptable founders, Ray Cauchi and Wayne Vella. While some business owners still argue against changing successful business models, Ray and Wayne say not embracing the concept of continuous improvement would be doing a disservice to its staff, customers and the industry at large.

“Regardless of how busy we get, Wayne and I always get together once a week to talk business, address certain issues and discuss what we can do to improve, whether it’s our equipment or how we manage our drivers’ health,” Ray explains. “I’ve been in the industry for almost four decades and if there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that you can never get complacent. Wayne and I must continually push the boundaries and we’re determined to look at all opportunities involving quarry products, port services and bulk storage.”

Almost a year ago over lunch, the two discussed the state of the Cartage Australia fleet, with productivity and safety high on the agenda. “Wayne suggested the idea of using side-tippers instead of the end tippers that we were accustomed to,” Ray says. “The idea had come up once or twice before, but we never really talked about it in great detail.”

The discussion then took a critical turn. “It wasn’t just about bringing in a standard side-tipper; Wayne wanted the design to have two side-tipping bodies built on the one chassis and have it approved under the Performance-Based Standards (PBS) scheme,” Ray says.

But there was even more to come: “Wayne wanted the side-tipper to run in a six-axle layout and have it towed as part of a rigid and dog combination,” Rays says. “That would address two areas of concern: One, having it as a PBS-approved truck and six-axle dog would allow us to increase our payload and two, a six-axle side-tipper would give us increased stability and be much safer than an end tipper, which is always at risk of a tip over. It would also allow access to almost any warehouse for our growing bulk storage business.”

The idea of using PBS-approved equipment isn’t new to Cartage Australia – in fact, all of the company’s rigid and dogs are PBS-approved – but never before has the company had a PBS six-axle dog. “PBS has been absolutely crucial to our operation as it has given us productivity gains between 10-25 per cent on each combination,” Ray says.

The challenge then became finding a trailer builder and equipment supplier to bring Wayne’s vision to life. “I spoke to a few manufacturers about our design and Muscat Trailers in Sydney was the first to put its hand up. Once we completed all the paperwork, including liaising with VicRoads and the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator to have it PBS certified, we placed an order for two rigid and six-axle dog combinations at once.”

According to Ray, the custom-made six-axle dog side-tippers – towed by two new Volvo FM rigid end tippers operating with Euro V engines that significantly reduce emissions – the combinations are capable of carrying a 47-tonne payload, which Ray says is two to three tonnes more than a B-double with the same gross weight would be able to haul. “It’s a smarter vehicle, which helps us to reduce the number of vehicles on the road while increasing both productivity and safety.”

Having arrived in September, the new six axle dogs have been spec’d to cart quarry products, and while Cartage Australia has used several suppliers in the past, the one major component brand that the company sticks with is SAF-HOLLAND – from its axle and suspensions, couplings and tow eyes through to ball races and EBS braking systems.

Like Cartage’s previous rigid and dog combinations, the six-axle units feature
SAF-HOLLAND’s Intradisc plus Integral axle and suspension system. “There’s never been issues with SAF-HOLLAND,” says Ray. “Its components are very light, the service and support is outstanding and, most importantly, when our drivers need to apply the brakes, the whole combination will quickly stop – just like a car.”

Despite the immediate benefits of the two rigid and six-axle dog combinations, Ray and Wayne will continue open talks on a week-by-week basis as a means to improve and further grow the business. And, Ray says it’s a safe bet SAF-HOLLAND and Muscat Trailers will factor into those discussions as well.

Trailer Magazine – Driven By Determination

news-4-heroThrough an uncompromising commitment to service and quality, Cartage Australia is growing from strength to strength. the Melbourne-based company opened a new facility in Sydney this year to go accommodate an ever-expanding fleet.

Ray Cauchi and Wayne Vella are the two men behind Cartage Australia. Together, they have built the business into a thriving fleet operation that now employs almost 100 people. But, building the business into what it is today hasn’t been easy. “It’s taken a lot of hard work and commitment,” says Ray, who has been in the business of hauling quarry products since 1977, when he first established Cauchi Transport. Then, seven years ago, it was amalgamated to form Cartage Australia.

“In this industry, you learn something new everyday. But, one of the most important things I’ve learned is if you give 100 per cent service to people and don’t let them down, the business just keeps on growing because people know they can rely on you.” At Cartage Australia, that’s not just a mission statement. The company provides its services 24 hours a day, seven days a week, hauling quarry products around Melbourne – and more recently, throughout Sydney, following the opening of a new facility in late 2011.

“We opened the Sydney operation so that we can offer the same sort of service to customers there as we provide in Melbourne, and so that we can continue to grow the company. Customers can call the company at any time and we’ll strive to get the job done for them,” says Ray. Cartage Australia was also quick to recognise the payload benefits that could be achieved under Performance Based Standards (PBS) and all vehicles in the company’s fleet operate under the scheme. The fleet currently includes six B-doubles, seven three-axle dogs, seven four-axle dogs, 12 five-axle dogs, 15 six-axle dogs and two semi trailers. Those numbers increased earlier this year, when Cartage Australia ordered 14 more combinations, including both five and six axle dogs, which went into service in both the Melbourne and Sydney operations.

The five-axle dog trailers are capable of carrying the same sorts of weights that can be expected from a B-double, but without all of the length. The custom-made six-axle dogs even take these weight gains one step further, allowing Cartage Australia to carry an additional three to four tonne in every load. All trailers in Cartage Australia’s fleet have been built by Hercules, while all prime movers are supplied by Volvo. “With the support of VicRoads, the RTA and the Transport Minister, we have created a smart vehicle, which has reduced the number of vehicles on the road while increasing both productivity and safety,” says Ray.

“We could buy a truck and a trailer for much cheaper but we’ve gone above our duty and spent the extra money because we believe that the public needs to be safe. It’s a win-win situation on every front, not just ours. This means it becomes cheaper for us to cart our product and that can then be passed on to our customers.

Ray is a firm believer that service is what matters most when you are running any business. “No matter what you buy, things will fail; what matters is how quick you are to respond,” he says. “When you’re running a 24 hour operation, you don’t have the luxury to wait until tomorrow to fix it. Our company believes in giving customers 100 per cent old-fashioned customer service. In order for us to give that service, we need our suppliers to be right up there with us otherwise we can’t perform.”

Despite expanding the Sydney arm of the business, Ray is on a constant lookout for ways to further grow the business. “Wayne and I want to grow Cartage Australia as much as we can,” says Ray, as he points to further growth planned for 2013 and beyond. He also reveals that the company would be expanding into another Australian state at some point this year, but is careful not to give too much away just yet.

Read More – Trailer Magazine – Driven by Determination

Prime Mover – Driven by Determination


news-5-heroThrough an uncompromising commitment to service and quality, Cartage Australia has continued to grow from strength to strength. The Melbourne based company has just opened a new facility in Sydney and plans are already afoot for further expansion.

Ray Cauchi and Wayne Vella are the two men behind Cartage Australia. Together they have built their business into a thriving 50 fleet operation that now employs almost 100 people.

But, building the business into what it is today hasn’t been easy. “It’s taken a lot of hard work and commitment,” says Ray, who has been in the business of hauling quarry products for more than 30 years. Ray began his quarrying business, Cauchi Transport, in 1977. Then, seven years ago, it was amalgamated to form Cartage Australia. “In this industry, you learn something new everyday. But, one of the most important things I’ve learned is if you give 100 per cent service to people and don’t let them down, the business just keeps on growing because people know they can rely on you.”

And Cartage Australia provides its services 24 hours a day, seven days a week, hauling quarry products around Melbourne – and more recently, throughout Sydney, following the opening of a new facility late last year. “We opened the Sydney operation so that we can offer the same sort of service to customers there as we provide in Melbourne, and so that we can continue to grow the company. Customers can call the company at any time and we’ll strive to get the job done for them,” says Ray.

Cartage Australia was quick to recognise the payload benefits that could be achieved under Performance Based Standards (PBS) and all vehicles in the company’s fleet operate under the scheme. The fleet currently includes six B-doubles, seven three axle dogs, seven four axle  12 five axle dogs, 15 six axle dogs and  semi trailers. However, this number is  to greatly increase, following an order for 14 new combinations, including both five and six axle dogs which will be put to work at the Melbourne and Sydney operations. The first of these is due for delivery on 10 February and all of the new vehicles are expected to be in operation by the end of April.

“With the support of Vic Roads, the RTA and the Transport Minister, we have created a smart vehicle, which has reduced the number of trucks on the road while increasing both productivity and safety.”
The five axle dog trailers are capable of carrying the same sorts of weights that can be expected from a B-double, but without all of the length.

The custom made six axle dogs take these weight gains one step further, allowing Cartage Australia to carry an additional three to four tonne in every load.

“With the support of Vic Roads, the RTA and the Transport Minister, we have created a smart vehicle, which has reduced the number of trucks on the road while increasing both productivity and safety,” says Ray. “We could buy a truck and a trailer for much cheaper but we’ve gone above our duty and spent the extra money because we believe that the public needs to be safe. It’s a win-win situation on every front, not just ours. This means it becomes cheaper for us to cart our product and that can then be passed on to our customers.

“PBS is virtually the future of the country. The freight task is only going to get bigger so we need to try and get trucks off the road. The only way to do that is to put more weight onto vehicles that are safer than those currently on the road.” All trailers in the fleet, including the latest order, have been built by Hercules, while all prime movers are supplied by Volvo.

Ray is a firm believer that service is what matters most when you are running any business. “No matter what you buy, things will fail; what matters is how quick you are to respond,” says Ray, who purchased his first Volvo truck in 1989 and has been impressed by the comfort and safety features of Volvo’s products, and the company’s service.

“When you’re running a 24 hour operation, you don’t have the luxury to wait until tomorrow to fix it. If the truck is broken down in the middle of the night, then we need someone to go and fix it in the middle of the night, otherwise the supply chain will stop. Our company believes in giving customers 100 per cent old-fashioned customer service. In order for us to give that service, we need our suppliers to be right up there with us – otherwise we can’t perform.”
Although the Sydney arm of the business has only been fully operational for a few months, Ray is already looking at ways to further grow the business. “Wayne and I want to grow Cartage Australia as much as we can,” says Ray, as he points to further growth planned for 2012.

He also revealed that the company would be expanding into another Australian state at some point this year, but was careful not to give too much away just yet.

Read More – Prime Mover – Driven By Determination

Trailer Magazine – Quality and Service “Second to None”

news-6-heroWhen it comes to making a purchase, Cartage Australia is a firm believer of sourcing high quality equipment that is made to go the distance – and all trailers in the fleet are fitted exclusively with saf intradisc suspension, including a new pbs approved five axle dog by hercules.

Operating a fleet of 8 B-doubles and 14 truck and dogs, Ray Cauchi has been hauling quarry products throughout metropolitan Melbourne for over thirty years. Ray Cauchi started Cauchi Transport, and seven years ago it was amalgamated to form Cartage Australia. With many of the vehicles working around the clock six days a week, the family owned company understands the value of utilising high productivity equipment and was quick to recognise the advantages PBS (Performance Based Standards) certification could provide. All truck and dogs in the fleet have been built to PBS specification. Although all B-doubles in the fleet are built by Hercules, this newest addition is the first five axle dog that has been built by Hercules to be added to the fleet.

Ray Cauchi who started Cartage Australia asserts that the biggest benefit of PBS approval is the increase in payloads. “On some PBS approved vehicles in our fleet, we are getting productivity gains of between 10-25 percent. The Hercules five axle dog will allow us to carry up to 44.5 tonne payload. There is a very wide range of trailers in our fleet, with capacities of 53.5 tonne gross, 54 tonne gross, 57.5 tonne gross and 63 tonne gross; and the B-doubles are capable of carrying up to 68.5 tonne gross.”

The new 28.5 cubic metre five axle dog has been purpose built for carting quarry products. Floor thicknesses are 8mm to the front and 10mm to the rear for greater impact resistance.

Although there are a variety of OEM supplied trailers and dogs, the one vital component that Cartage Australia specifies is equipment supplied by SAF Holland including suspension, axles, V.Orlandi couplings and tow eyes, ball race and EBS braking systems.

This unit features a SAF Intradisc plus Integral integrated axle and suspension system, with an automated lift axle to the front axle of the rear tri group. The functional suspension arm and axle beam form an inseparable and maintenance free unit which does away with the need for U-bolts, clamping plates, axle seats and nuts. The construction remains completely robust, yet lightweight. Functional reliability is obtained by a high quality KTL coating with optimum corrosion protection. The shock absorber also receives adequate protection thanks to its positioning inside the functional suspension arm. It is exactly matched to the suspension system and is mounted in the middle of the hanger bracket. Pressed into the functional suspension arm, the SAF 3D bush absorbs wheel, side tilt and braking forces to greatly increase handling stability.

A key benefit of this system is its patented radial expansion technology where the disc expands radially and retracts radially as it cools, thus eliminating any ‘hot-spots’ that can result in cracking or failure of the disc. This is achieved by casting the disc on a high strength splined adaptor ring which is bolted to the wheel flange as a selfcontained unit which creates a clearance free connection between the adaptor ring and the brake disc as the two parts are not fused together. As brake surfaces remain flat in all operating states, the service life of the pad is significantly extended.

“We believe in paying for a quality product up front so that there are less problems later on during the life of the trailer,” says Ray. “That’s why all of our units are fitted exclusively with SAF axles, suspensions and EBS braking systems. We have been dealing directly with SAF for many years and the product along with the service provided is second to none.”

Read More – Trailer Magazine – Quality and service “second to none”

Trailer Magazine – Weight Savings

news-7-heroAfter 12 months of persistent hard work, CMV Volvo Laverton, Gorski engineering and Cartage Australia have received new pbs approval for greater weights on their truck and quad-dog combinations.

With operators looking to maximise revenue through increased payload, the news that VicRoads has increased the PBS-approved mass weight limit from 50 tonne to 54 tonne on truck and quaddog combinations will be welcomed by all operators.

Besides the initial outlay costs being reduced, ongoing general expenditure will be cut across the board, since the combination will now be able to carry the same load as a traditional 19 metre B-Double. Other beneficial features include low tare weight, no special legislated driver training requirements and a superior swept path. The new PBS permit should also help to reduce congestion on Victorian roads by minimising the need for B-Double combinations in many applications.

The new PBS permit was based on an application to VicRoads by Charles Bunker-Smith of CMV Volvo Laverton, on behalf of Ray Cauchi of Cartage Australia. Ray, for some time, had been seeking an
increased payload on his fleet of Volvo prime movers and Gorski Engineering truck and quad-dog tippers. Through numerous vehicle certification procedures with the NTC, VicRoads and other engineering consultancy firms, Charles was granted approval in February 2009. For the relevant governing bodies, the decision was made easier by knowing the combinations had been built by companies with the proven track records of Volvo and Gorski Engineering.

The approval is minimising the total number of units on the road and better utilising existing trailer specifications and measurements.

“The tippers built for this application are aligned with premium ancillary equipment, including SAF-Holland Intradisc air suspension, ABC EBS, JOST ballrace turntables and hoists, ALCOA
Durabrite rims, Camilleri and Razor tarping equipment, and HELLA LED lighting. “With the current economy affecting everyone, operators are looking to increase productivity on their equipment. Ray was pushing for an increased payload and his combination of Volvo and Gorski makes it perfectly capable,” explains Ken Gorski, founder of Gorski Engineering.

Being the preferred supplier for Cartage Australia, and with a number of units already built to this specification, Gorski Engineering will continue to provide trailers suitable for the increased weight limit, with the opportunity to supply these units in the future with differing configurations subject to PBS compliance and approval. A number of specifications have been put in place to comply with the new PBS permit. All four-axle dog trailers must be manufactured by Gorski Engineering, while up front, the trucks must be a Volvo 480 with a Euro 4 engine or later meeting ADR 80/01.

All vehicles will comply with the Higher Mass Limits routes network, will have key auxiliary braking requirements, and be fitted with front under-run protection and EBS (considered by Vic Roads to be the most advanced braking system currently available). Gorski Engineering’s Amelie Gorski says, “We believe the PBS permit is a step in the right direction. The approval from the relevant Victorian State Government departments is minimising the total number of units on the road and better utilising existing trailer specifications, measurements and safety guidelines. “This is sure to benefit all operators once relevant to compliance.”

Read more: Trailer Magazine – Weight Savings

Trailer Magazine – A Matter of Trust

news-8-heroWith a strong belief that nothing but the best will do, cartage australia trusts the solid reliability of saf-holland running gear.

Formerly known as Cauchi Transport, Cartage Australia began life in 1977 as a family-owned cartage company, hauling quarry products within the metropolitan area of Melbourne. An amalgamation five years ago facilitated rapid growth in the business, to the extent where the company now runs a fleet of 21 vehicles (B-Double tippers from Hercules and four-axle dog tippers from Gorski), with about half of these running six days a week, 24 hours
a day.

Recently, Cartage Australia along with Gorski and CMV Volvo in Laverton worked together to achieve a great boost for the industry – an increase in the amount of weight allowed on four-axle dogs. In Cartage Australia’s case, this means being able to get 54 tonne on its dogs with a payload of around 37 tonne.

After a dearth of new developments in recent times, this is a very welcome change for the industry. “The industry needs something like this,” says Ray Cauchi of Cartage Australia. “Over the last four or five years, our costs have
been going up in just about every area, but rates haven’t been matching, so we really need a positive development.”

While keeping costs down is the greatest challenge Cartage Australia faces, Ray believes that the only way to respond to that challenge is to source quality products, a belief which lead him to turn to the SAFHolland
range of running gear, including the 22.5” Intradisc plus Integral axle system.

“We’ve found that the only way to keep costs down is to buy the best products on the market when we buy our vehicles. In order to do this, we use SAF-Holland on all of our trailers,” says Ray. “We actually bought the first four axles that came into Australia on the first shipment and they worked perfectly for us straight away. They might be a little bit more expensive than other axles, but you can’t have it both ways – you either pay the money up front and get the good stuff; or you get them cheap, which you end up paying for in the long run anyway.”

“We’ve found that the only way to keep costs down is to buy the best products on the market when we buy our vehicles. In order to do this, we use SAF-Holland on all of our trailers,” Ray Cauchi

The KOMPENSATOR® is another innovative design produced and distributed by SAFHolland that Cartage  Australia has taken on board. The KOMPENSATOR® is a patented specialty fifth wheel mounting system
designed for torsionally rigid trailers where the centre of gravity of the loaded trailer does not exceed one metre above the top surface of the fifth wheel. It relieves the twisting force between truck and trailer, providing controlled front-to-rear and sideto-side oscillation.

Cartage Australia chose the KOMPENSATOR® as the perfect match for the V.Orlandi couplings it sources through SAF-Holland, with benefits including improved tyre life and a reduction in truck, trailer and tank cracks. Definite yes to EBS When it comes to the debate over electronic braking, Cartage Australia is definitely in the ‘ayes’, choosing to install SAF-Holland’s EBS system across its whole fleet. In fact, since trying the prototype
when it was released, Ray says he has never looked back.

“It’s worth it for the driver, it’s worth it for the company and we look at it as a matter of how many accidents we don’t have thanks to EBS. The difference is like driving a 1964 Holden on drum brakes and then hopping in the latest model Commodore on disc brakes,” says Ray.

“If we’re going to convince the regulators and the public to let us have extra weight, then we have to have the right equipment on our vehicles. If the technology is there, we want to use it. I have my family on the road as well and I don’t want to put anything on the road that is not safe.”

Read more: Trailer Magazine – A Matter of Trust